Are dads getting the respect from society that they deserve? 

By Henry Adeleye on June 19, 2015 

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Peter Griffin, Homer Simpson, Al Bundy.  That's how most dads on TV are portrayed.  The guy who works all day and only provides financial support, the deadbeat or completely absent father.  That's how most dads in real life are portrayed.  The truth, however, is that most dads actually step up to the plate and do what they're supposed to do, whether for their own kids or someone else's.  Father's Day is just a few short days away.  There probably won't be any parades, but you can provide that special man in your life something way better:  Love.       

A friend of mine posted a while back that dads get no love.  Of course, compared to Mother's Day, that's more than likely true.  And with some single mothers celebrating Father's Day, they may think the holiday is getting watered down.  How did we get to this point?  Maybe dads are just misunderstood.  Maybe the tough guy persona that's given to men makes people think that they don't want affection.  Maybe all the clueless dad portrayals on TV have finally taken their toll, and people just assume dads aren't smart enough to even change a diaper.  Hopefully my friend is wrong, but more than likely he's right.   

Let him know that he’s enough.

In an ideal world, people wouldn't need praise for doing the things they're supposed to just do.  But the world is not ideal, and here on Earth, people are vain and need validation.  Because your mom gave birth to you, there's an inherent connection that makes you gravitate towards her.  It makes you want to do everything in your power to make her happy, as if that can somehow repay her for bringing you into the world.  For dads, that connection isn't as strong.  And because of that, dads don't seem to get enough love, even though their need for validation makes them want that love just as much as moms do, regardless of if they show it or not.

This weekend, you'll hear someone say, "Happy Father's Day to all the good dads," as if the not-so-good dads don't need love too.  Would you ever say, "Happy Mother's Day to all the good moms"?  Strong women, by choice or by circumstance, have been raising children that turn out to be great on their own for a while now, so maybe that's the reason for it.  But let's help dads show that they're indeed needed and appreciated, despite that.  Show them as much love this weekend as you showed your mom for Mother's Day.  Get the big guy something from the heart instead of just another tie.  Take him out to dinner.  Grill some steaks for him.  Show him how much you care.  Let him know that he's enough. 

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AuthorHenry Adeleye